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Title Music, sound, and technology in America : a documentary history of early phonograph, cinema, and radio / edited by Timothy D. Taylor, Mark Katz, and Tony Grajeda.
Published Durham, NC : Duke University Press, 2012.
Book Cover
LOCATION CALL # STATUS
 Music - Books  ML3917.U6 M89 2012    IN LIBRARY
  
Description 410 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Series American studies/Film and music history
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references (p. [387]-398) and index.
Contents "The phonograph and its future." / Thomas A. Edison (North American Review 126 (1878), 530-36) -- "The phonograph." (New York Times, 7 November 1877, 4) -- "What the phonograph will do for music and music-lovers." / Philip G. Hubert Jr. (Century Magazine, May 1893, 152-54) -- Edison realism test (Broadside, c. 1916) -- "Illustrated song machine." (Talking Machine World, October 1905, 33); and "Illustrated song machine." (Talking Machine World, November 1905, 33) -- "Times and seasons." / Orlo Williams (Gramophone, June 1923, 38-39) -- How we gave a phonograph party (New York: National Phonograph Company, 1899) -- "Susan, dear Sue (The Phonograph Song) / Jas O'Dea, Arthur Gillespie, and Herbert Dillea. (New York: Witmark, 1901) -- "The home set to music." / Pauline Partridge (Sunset, November 1924, 68, 75-76) -- Questionnaire and responses, 1921 / Thomas A. Edison, Inc. (Collection of the University of Michigan Libraries, Ann Arbor) -- "The victor in the rural school." / Annie Pike Greenwood (Journal of Education, 26 February 1914, 235) -- "Organize a music memory contest." (Talking Machine Journal, March 1919, 8) -- Victrola advertisement (Collier's, 4 October 1913, back cover) -- Aeolian-Vocalion advertisement (Vanity Fair, May 1916, 115) -- "Having different types of women customers." / Gladys L. Kimmel (Talking Machine Journal, June 1920, 17, 74-75) -- "Where are the ladies?" / Scrutator ([letter to the editor] Gramophone, June 1925, 39) -- "Ladies and Gramophone?" / T.A.F. ([letter to the editor] Gramophone, August 1925, 147) -- "Women and the Gramophone" / Gladys M. Collin. ([letter to the editor] Gramophone, October 1925, 247) -- "Women and the phonograph" / Dorothy B. Fisher. ([letter to the editor]. Phonograph Monthly Review, October 1926, 30-31) -- "Talking machines are essentials." (Talking Machine Journal, December 1917, 7, 50) -- "When I hear that phonograph play." / Vivian Burnett (New York: M. Witmark and Sons, 1918) -- "Phonographs on the firing line : they need your "Slacker" records." (Independent, 19 October 1919, 126) -- "How talking machine orchestras operate." (Violinist, September 1910, 38) -- "Making a phonograph record." / Yvonne De Treville. (Musician, November 1916, 658) -- The Baby Dodds story, revised edition / Baby Dodds (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1992, 69-76) [on recording jazz in 1923] -- "Conducting for record." / Edwin McArthur (Listen, March 1941, 4-5) -- "The effect of mechanical instruments upon musical education." (Etude, July 1916, 483-84)
The Oscar Saenger course in vocal training : a complete course of vocal study for the tenor voice on Victor Records, 9, 10, 12, 13, 24, 33 / Oscar Saenger (Camden, N.J.: Victor Talking Machine Company, 1916) -- "Music of and for the records." / Henry Cowell (Modern Music 8 (March-April 1931), 32-34) -- An autobiography / Igor Stravinsky. (1936. Reprint, New York: W. W. Norton, 1962) -- "Recorded noises : tomorrow's instrumentation" / Carol-Bérard (Modern Music 6 (January-February 1929), 26-29) -- "Meine Stellung zur Schallplatte." / Igor Stravinsky (Kultur und Schallplatte 1 (March 1930), 65) -- "The menace of mechanical music." / John Philip Sousa (Appleton's, 1906, 278-84) -- "An ordinance regulating the use of phonographs, graphophones and like instruments within certain districts." / Portland (Oregon) City Council (Minutes of the Portland City Council, 14 August 1907, 499. Portland (Oregon) City Council [and] Minutes of the Portland City Council, 27 November 1907, 70) -- "Canned music" : is it taking the romance from our lives?" / Joseph N. Weber ( Musician, November 1930, 7-8. Pro) -- "The menace of mechanical music" : some of the replies evoked by Mr. Sousa's article / Paul H. Cromelin (Appleton's, 1906, 639-40) -- "Phonographs and player instruments / Anne Shaw Faulkner (National Music Monthly, August 1917, 27-29) -- "The Kineto-Phonograph." (Electrical World, 16 June 1894, 799-801) -- "'The perfection of the phono-cinematograph" ([editorial] Moving Picture World, 14 September 1907, 435) -- Advertisement for Picturephone. "Singing and talking moving pictures."(Moving Picture World, 11 January 1908, 31) -- "The singing and talking picture" What is its future?" ([editorial]. Moving Picture World, 7 May 1910, 727-28) -- "Talking "movies." (Outlook, 8 March 1913, 517) -- "Illustrating song slides." / Chas. K. Harris ( Moving Picture World, 9 March 1907, 5-6) -- "Song slide review: "the best thing in life."" / Chas. K. Harris (Moving Picture World, 16, March 1907, 30) -- "The Singer and the Song." / H.F. Hoffman (Moving Picture World, 4 June 1910, 935) -- "The value of a lecture." / Van C. Lee. (Moving Picture World, 8 February 1908, 93) -- "The value of a lecture with the show" / E. Esther Owen and W.M. Rhoads ( [letters to the editor in reply to Lee's article] Moving Picture World, 22 February 1908) -- "How talking pictures are made; scarcity of picture actors." / Sydney Wire (Moving Picture World, 22 August 1908, 137) -- "The human voice as a factor in the moving picture show." / W. Stephen Bush (Moving Picture World, 23 January 1909, 86)
"The human voice as a factor in the moving picture show" / James Clancy (Moving Picture World, 30 January 1909, 115) -- "Trade notes", "When 'music' is a nuisance." / (Moving Picture World, 28 December 1907) -- "Sound effects : good, bad, and indifferent" / ([editorial] Moving Picture World, 2 October 1909, 441-42) -- "Music for the picture." / Clarence E. Sinn (Moving Picture World, 23 April 1910, 593-94) -- "Jackass music." / Louis Reeves Harrison (Moving Picture World, 21 January 1911, 124-25) -- "Jackass music" / Wm. H. McCracken ([letter to the editor] Moving Picture World, 28 January 1911, 176) -- "Jackass music" / Mrs. Buttery (Moving Picture World, 4 February 1911, 258) -- "Music and sound effects for Dante's Inferno." / W. Stephen Bush (Moving Picture World, 27 January 1912, 283-84) -- "Playing to pictures." / L. Szeminanyi (Strad, February 1921, 327) -- "A cinema musician." "Atmosphere." / (Strad, March 1926, 17) -- "Cinema music." / Ernest M. Skinner (American Organist, August 1918, 417-18, 421) -- "Creation of atmosphere." / J. van Cleft Cooper (American Organist, June 1922, 240-42) -- "How music is made to fit the films." / (Literary Digest, 26 January 1918, 58) -- "Possibilities of movie music, present and future." / Doron K. Antrim (Metronome, 15 February 1926, 20, 75) -- "Scoring a motion picture." / Victor Wagner (Transactions of the Society of Motion Picture Engineers, September 1926, 40-43) -- "Hugo Riesenfeld tells how he scores a film." / Josephine Vila (Musical Courier, 17 February 1927, 48) -- "A word about suitable and unsuitable music in moving picture productions." / Frank A. Edson (Metronome, March 1918, 44) -- "Choosing picture music that pleases the patrons : an interview with Edward L. Hyman" / (Metronome, 1 February 1926, 55) -- "Why music is becoming the important element in picture presentation." / Dr. Sigmund Spaeth (Metronome, 15 March 1926, 21, 25) -- "Opera singer gets thrill out of screen debut." / Josephine Vila (Musical Courier, 20 January 1927, 40) -- "What modern music has done to the motion picture theaters." / L.K. Sidney (Metronome, January 1928, 26)
"Will machine-made music displace real music in our theatres?" / Joseph N. Weber (Metronome, September 1928, 50, 102) -- "Talking pictures and the public." / Warren Nolan (Transactions of the Society of Motion Picture Engineers, 1929, 131-34) -- "What the fans think," Picture play : "Talkie gets a guffaw," March 1929; "Voice censor suggested," March 1929; "Another fan deserts!" April 1929; "Real singers would go over," February 1932; "Carrying English to England," February 1932; "Adores Yankee talk," November 1932; "Our rural accents," November 1932 -- "Distributing music over telephone lines" / (Telephony, 18 December 1909, 699-701) -- "Radio telephone experiments." / (Modern Electrics, May 1910, 63) -- "Radio music box." / David Sarnoff; "Memorandum to Edward J. Nally, Vice-president and General Manager, Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company of America, c. 1916-1920" / David Sarnoff (Looking ahead : the papers of David Sarnoff: (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1968, 31-32) -- "The ether will now oblige." / Bruce Bliven (New Republic, 15 February 1922, 328-30) -- "Five minutes of radio for a nickel." / Joseph Riley (Radio News, April 1926, 1433) -- Leon Lichtenfeld / interview by Layne R. Beaty, 29 May 1988 (Library of American Broadcasting, University of Maryland, Transcripts AT 1336) -- "Singing to tens of thousands : impressions of an artist during his first radio concert." / Leon Alfred Duthernoy (Radio Broadcast, November 1922, 49-51) -- "Letter to the Symphony Society of New York." / Helen Keller (New York Times, 10 February 1924, 1, part 2, p. 8) -- "Memorandum for Mr. J.A. Holman, Manager of Broadcasting, March 1924" / George McClelland, Head of Sales, WEAF [New York City] (National Broadcasting Company Archives, box 5, folder 1, Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison) -- "Wireless music and news for the roller chair passenger" / (Scientific American, 7 August 1920, 131) -- "Very latest in wireless : Union College students find a "universal lullaby" for babies." / (New York Times, 11 May 1921, 12) -- "Radio now heard on buses in New York City" / (Radio World, 27 May 1922, 29) -- "Advance seat sale for radio concerts" / (Popular Radio, October 1923, 528) -- "Letter to the editor" / Bess B. Harris (Radio Broadcast, April 1924, 528, 530) -- ""Sing Down the Cattle" by Radio." / (Popular Radio, October 1926, 615)
"Wedding has radio music; Orchestra at WAAM fills gap left by missing players." / (New York Times, 1 January 1927, 7) -- "Maimed and sick forget pain in model radio-equipped ambulance" / (Radio Digest, 3 June 1922, 2) -- "Radio relief for the ailing." / Ward Seeley (Wireless Age, August 1922, 35) -- "Jazzing the deaf by radio." / (Popular Radio, March 1926, 296) -- "Radio Music Fund Committee appeals to listeners-in for contributions." / (Radio World, 1 March 1924, 12) -- "How much should good radio program cost? Most frequently asked question is hardest to answer." / (Broadcast Advertising, January 1930, 6-7) -- "Radio broadcast advertisements; airphone advertising will kill fan interest." / (Radio Digest, 24 June 1922, 10) -- Davey Tree Hour [script from 5 January 1930] / (J. Walter Thompson Company Archives, Duke University, As Broadcast Scripts, reel 10) -- J. Walter Thompson Company. Representatives Meeting, 14 January 1930 / (J. Walter Thompson Company Archives, Duke University, box 2, folder 3) -- Martin L. Davey. Letter to E.P.H. James, Sales Promotion Manager, National Broadcasting Company, 1 September 1931 / (National Broadcasting Company Archives, box 3, folder 5, Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison) -- Secrets of a successful radio program; Tastes and sensibilities of listeners always respected; Sponsor's salesmen find welcome, easier orders / (Broadcasting, 1 July 1932, 9) -- Undated fan letter to Martin L. Davey / Justine Magee (Kent State University, Davey Tree Expert Company, Records, box 21, folder 15, Davey Tree Company: Radio Programs: 1930-32) -- Radio just another blight : a plaint from East Orange [N.J.] on the tendencies of the time / A.J.M. ([letter to the editor] New York Times, 31 December 1925, 14) -- "Thomas A. Edison sees a menace for music in the radio." / Paul Kempf (Musician, January 1927, 1) -- Excerpts from an address broadcast from WJZ [Newark] / John C. Freund (Wireless Age, May 1922, 36) -- "Opera audiences of tomorrow; America to become a music-loving nation through radio broadcasting." / Lee de Forest (Radio World, 5 August 1922, 13)
"Programs lauded by bandmasters" / (New York Times, 12 September 1926, 11, p. 2) -- "What we think the public wants" / E.F. McDonald Jr. (Radio Broadcast, March 1924, 382-84) -- Floyd Gibbons School of Broadcasting [correspondence course]. (Lesson no. 19: How to train a singing voice for broadcasting, 1932. "The art of crooning," 16-17) -- "Rudy Vallée : God's gift to us girls." / Martha Gellhorn (New Republic, 7 August 1929, 310-11) -- "Cardinal denounces crooners as whiners defiling the air" / (New York Times, 11 January 1932, 21) -- "Mr. Bolton Queries "When was a crooner a man in love?; Applauds Cardinal; thinks stand well taken"" / (Morning Telegraph, 12 January 1932, 2) -- "Crooners cover up; pass well known buck" / (Morning Telegraph, 13 January 1932, 2) -- "Crooning comes by nature." / ([editorial]. New York Times, 24 February 1932, 20) -- "How to get on a radio program." / James H. Collins (Popular Radio, February 1925, 109-17) -- Audition form, National Broadcasting Company, c. 1930 / (National Broadcasting Company Archive, box 2, folder 82, Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison) -- "Requirements of the radio singer." / Olive Palmer (Etude, December 1931, 849-50) -- Letter to John Royal, Program Director, National Broadcasting Company, 11 January 1932 / Myda Adams (National Broadcasting Company Archive, box 6, folder 38, Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison) -- "Have you a radio voice?" / ([advertisement] Radio Guide 28 January 1932, 9) -- "The vicissitudes of a radio impresario." / Harvey B. Gaul (Wireless Age, September 1922, 53) -- "Putting a program on the air" / Gustav Klemm (Etude, March 1933, 163-64) -- "A glimpse "behind the mike" during the Palmolive Hour." / Herbert Devins (Radio revue for the listener, December 1929, 27) -- "Creating scores for radio." / Viva Liebling (Musical Courier, 20 January 1944, 9) -- "The background of background music : how NBC's experts fit music to the mood and action of dramatic shows." / Rose Heylbut (Etude, September 1945, 493-94) -- "Music as presented by the radio" / Peter W. Dykema (New York : The Radio Institute of the Audible Arts, 1935).
Summary This anthology assembles primary documents chronicling the development of the phonograph, talking pictures, and the radio. These three sound technologies shaped Americans' relation to music from the late nineteenth century until the end of the Second World War, by which time they were thoroughly integrated into Americans' everyday lives. There are more than 120 selections between the collection's first piece, an article on the phonograph written by Thomas Edison in 1878, and its last, a column published in 1945, advising listeners "desirous of gaining more from music as presented by the radio." Among the selections are articles from popular and trade publications, advertisements, fan letters, corporate records, fiction, and sheet music. Taken together, the selections capture how the new sound technologies were shaped by developments such as urbanization, the increasing value placed on leisure time, and the rise of the advertising industry.
Subject Popular music -- Social aspects -- United States -- 20th century.
Popular culture -- United States -- History -- 20th century.
Phonograph -- United States -- History -- 20th century.
Radio broadcasting -- United States -- History -- 20th century.
Motion picture music -- United States -- History -- 20th century.
Mass media -- Technological innovations -- United States -- History -- 20th century.
Related Names Taylor, Timothy Dean.
Katz, Mark, 1970-
Grajeda, Tony, 1960-
ISBN 9780822349273 (cloth : alk. paper)
0822349272 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780822349464 (pbk. : alk. paper)
0822349469 (pbk. : alk. paper)
OCLC number 768569729